Bold predictions of 2019 Hunting Trends

Although hunting is known to be steeped in tradition, there are popular trends and innovation that push the lifestyle and sport forward. Here are some bold predictions as to what expect for this coming 2019 season. Keep in mind that these predictions are for entertainment, designed to be bold, but also derived from an initial element of truth.

Prediction No. 1: Backcountry Shawls Outsell Quilts and Hammocks Combined

Now I’m not saying that quilts and hammocks are a dying trend. Quite the opposite actually, these everyday comfort items are on an upward trajectory that should be spurring the imagination of more performance gear developers. The lines between casual recreation, comfort, weight savings and performance will continue to smear together into a multifunctional gear bonanza, and I am all for it. Old familiar comfort items are going to be repurposed and updated. Think of the possibilities: backcountry shawls, field robes, sport pajamas, packable essential oil diffusers, performance loungers. Now that your grandma’s favorite decorative bedspread has been converted to backpacking gear, nothing is off the table. I personally own multiple pairs of tent slippers as well, and they are fabulous. When you spend days deep in the wild, why shouldn’t have have some luxuries that remind you of all the comforts of home?
All joking aside, the creativity of gear developers has taken a major jump forward in the last couple years. The outdoor gear industry has always had a steady push forward with innovation, but now that we have hammocks and quilts, the period of innovation efforts previous feels a little stale. The previous gear trends have had a lot of focus towards style and branding development over performance development. I think the industry now has an injection of creative brands that are willing to break away and take risks, and I am excited to see what they come up with next.

Prediction No. 2: WOOL UNDERWEAR! (Wait, that’s already a thing?) Fine, I’ll go with WOOL DENIM!

Yes wool underwear is a thing. It’s merino wool and it’s fantastic. It has become the dominating fabric in many hunters’ baselayers, and it is obvious why: Quick drying, cool when it needs to be cool, warm when it needs to be warm, thin and less bulky, and now even comfortable. To bastardize one of the great Seinfeld lines to emphasize my point: “I would drape myself in velvet merino wool if it were socially acceptable”. Wool denim jeans are probably the last article I need to complete my ensemble for everyday casual wear.

A lot of outdoor brands are dialing in their merino blends with polyester, spandex and nylon to give it the comfort and stretch needed to be the go-to fabric for all four seasons. I would like to predict a merino underwear supply shortage sweeps the nation in 2019 and riots erupt in the street. But that’s unrealistic. Merino resists odor and stink, so you really only need one or two pair for a week-long hunt. With that kind of performance longevity, it’s unlikely the demand will soar high enough to reach critical levels. So it’s pretty unlikely that there will be panicked stockpiling by hunters to deplete the nation’s supply. As long as sheep keep growing it, I think we’ll be fine.

Prediction No. 3: Hunting Becomes Just Unpopular Enough for Hipsters to Join in

Americans participating in hunting have dipped over recent years. This is not to say that the industry is in trouble, as fishing participation has increased, and sportsmen and women are spending more dollars per capita than they have in the past. With increased dollars spent on hunting and fishing-related equipment, the funding from the Pittman-Robertson Act tax revenue has remained a strong funding source for state wildlife conservation. The low hunter participation may indicate a bleak trend for the longevity of the sport and lifestyle, but I think we are actually on the verge of attracting an untapped demographic. I think if we all just dug a little deeper, we could drive hunting popularity another 1% lower, which may be the breaking point of unpopularity for hipster participation. I know it sounds far out there, but try and follow me here: Hipsters have an initial threshold of unpopularity, which is the barrier for entry for something to become cool to them. Once that unpopularity threshold is reached and they can deem it cool, that unpopularity threshold is raised several percentage points (obviously this threshold must be raised to accommodate the influx of hipster participants, otherwise the increased popularity would create a situation where the hipster was participating in something that should be considered uncool). Now, unfortunately this model is not sustainable, because after a period of hipster participation, hunting will be deemed played out by the hipsters, and they will leave the activity as mostly one solitary mass, very similar to the way they entered. The key point here is that not all will abandon hunting, some will stay and continue to contribute to the lifestyle and wildlife conservation. Also, it has been clearly documented that right before hipsters deem an activity played out, there is an influx on non-hipsters that flood the activity. These remaining participants that joined during the end of the hipster craze will undoubtedly find a true dedication and connection with the outdoors and wildlife, and they will remain as lifelong supporters and advocates. These remaining hunters will cause a net increase that will keep hunter participation levels boosted over recent year’s statistics for years to come.

Prediction No. 4: Eating Wolf Becomes Cool

Wild game meat has had a huge PR boost since the Meateater movement pushed forth a few years ago. Squirrel, black bear, and jackrabbit are three species that were not broadly considered to be palatable, but now have seen a more widespread increase as a consumable and favored game meat. Long-standing prejudices against the palatability of many wild game have been challenged and dispelled.
With the increased culinary popularity has come an increase in  adventurousness in wild meat consumption, and possibly some one-upmanship as well. Therefore, next up on the list has to be wolf meat. Not just sampling wolf meat, because there have been isolated reports of people eating wold in the U. S., but experimentation with preparation and cooking methods to actually make it popular. Given the fortitude required to actually coherse the morsels of the meat down your gullet, combined with the hunting challenge due to the wolf’s cunning, wolf is positioned to be the next critter up to become table fare of the hunting elite. Other cultures around the world have enjoyed canine meat, and it was well documented that the Lewis and Clark expedition preferred dog meat over all else available on their journey. That is not to say that the canine prepared by others through history is going to be the same as a wild wolf harvested by a hunter. Diverse diets, living conditions, as well as method are all variables that affect the quality of an animal’s flesh from a palate’s viewpoint. But, it seems to be the most reasonable culinary analog. Pushing the boundaries of our comfort zone is what helps us venture further into the wilderness and be more capable hunters, and I think we can agree that wolf is well outside the current comfort zone for most of us. Also, eating the animal you kill is a way of showing respect for its life. Harvesting meat is not the only reason for people to get out and hunt, but my personal opinion is that it should be near the top of everyone’s power rankings of motivation, and we all should be giving well-deserved consideration when we go out to hunt an animal.

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